Desperate for Respite
Sherri Torjman, January 1997
Respite care is a service for caregivers.  It provides relief for the individuals who care at home for a severely disabled or ill child, an ailing spouse or a frail or sick parent.  Respite care is in short supply – relative to the current and anticipated demand for this service.  Despite the growing need, the financial support for respite care is far from adequate and actually has declined.  Recent changes to the financing of social services at the federal level will only make matters worse.  In the face of an aging population and spiralling health costs, we ignore this crucial area of public policy at our peril.

ISBN - 1-895796-67-9

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-‘Basic Income’ or ‘Bait and Switch’? -Disability Supports and Employment Policy -Strengthening Canada’s Public Employment Service Post-Devolution -Minimum Wage, Maximum Wager in Alberta -Using low income and material deprivation to monitor poverty reduction -Some thoughts on a National Housing Strategy -Innovation: counting what counts -Canada Pension Plan: The New Deal -Risks and rewards of the sharing economy -Long-Term Commitment for Long-Term Care -The Labour Market Agreements: What Did They Really Do? -When is a dollar more than a dollar? -The Canada Child Benefit Needs to be Fully Indexed to Inflation -Welfare in Canada, 2014 -May 19, 2016: Michael Mendelson Addresses the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology on changes to the Employment Insurance program in the 2016 federal Budget -Video - Data Rescue -Video - Sherri Torjman: Five Good Ideas about Policy -Video - Sherri Torjman: Canada@150 address -Video - Sherri Torjman: Shared Space & Community Recreation -

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